Longford land marketed to international developers

A Melbourne real estate agency is selling the land that abuts the 18-hole Sale Golf Club course as a potential “299-lot” planning residential development.

A Melbourne real estate agency is selling the land that abuts the 18-hole Sale Golf Club course as a potential “299-lot” planning residential development.

A 52-HECTARE allotment in Longford that was once part of a bold golf resort development plan and has been the subject of 10 years of planning debate, is now being marketed to international developers at an expected price of more than $3 million.

A Melbourne real estate agency is selling the land that abuts the 18-hole Sale Golf Club course as a potential "299-lot" planning residential development.

About 10 years ago there were plans for the vacant land at 2631 Rosedale-Longford Rd to be part of an upmarket fully-serviced residential golf estate.

The Sale golf course land was rezoned in 2007 to make way for the integrated golf course and fully serviced residential development of up to 300 lots, with Wellington Shire Council issuing a planning permit for subdivision of the land in 2008.

Then Deputy Premier and Gippsland South MLA Peter Ryan and Wellington Shire mayor at the time, Jeff Amos, were among guests of honour at the turning of the sod ceremony on March 4, 2011, at Sale Golf Club.

Known as The Vantage Point golf residential development, the project represented the most significant community and tourism development in the Wellington Shire for decades.

But the proposal stalled, and the owners of both land parcels subsequently changed direction.

The land adjacent to the course is now being sold as a potential residential development, attracting interest from international and local developers.

Biggin & Scott's land sales manager Callum Williamson said the development would be great for the area, and could boost employment and facilities, with developers required to contribute to infrastructure improvements.

Mr Williamson said the "outstanding piece of land" and potential development would give an "upside" to the golf club and future residents of the development.

Jeff Blunden, a Melbourne-based golf consultant, said the residential golf phenomenon was popular in the 1990s and early 2000s, but had since slowed because the formula required to make a feasible development has become increasingly challenged.

“There are a number of key elements required for feasible golf real estate developments,” he said.

“These include those related to scale such as land size, lot numbers, percentage of usable land, and those related to golf including golf course size, design, demand and exit strategy.”

The Longford land - now zoned comprehensive development - is being sold with the “development concept plan” of a 299-lot estate.

A Wellington Shire Council spokesperson said it was a “matter for the developer to advance the requirements of the subdivision approval”.

The sales brochure, which promotes the area as “boasting fantastic rural and forest surrounds, proximity to beaches, rivers and lakes, ideal for recreational walks, fishing and boating”, states that there is an existing integrated planning permit which contained the land being offered for sale “together with some adjoining land owned by the Sale Golf Club”.

“This previous integrated permit was the outcome of discussions between the vendor and the Sale Golf Club as the two adjoining land owners, and, note the Sale Golf Club land does not form part of this offering.”

Expressions of interest close next Wednesday, May 24.

Gippsland Senior
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