CGHS emergency department gets a good report

CENTRAL Gippsland Health Service has been able to perform well despite a challenge financial environment, according to its chief executive.

The latest Victorian Health Services performance data shows CGHS is performing well as part of the public health system.

The report, covering the three months to the end of June, shows CGHS has improved its performance in a number of key areas.

The service admitted 3100 patients in the three months to the end of June, up from 2763 in the previous three months.

It provided a total of 7796 bed days to patients in the three months to the end of June, up from 6935 for the previous quarter.

It provided a total of 7796 bed days to patients in the three months to the end of June, up from 6935 for the previous quarter.

During the reporting period, the service provided an average of 24 hours of care per day in the intensive care unit, up from an average of 15 hours in the June 2012 quarter.

One hundred per cent of category one emergency patients were treated immediately on arrival at the hospital emergency department in the three months to the end of June.

CGHS treated 97 per cent of category two patients within 10 minutes of arrival at the ED in the three months to the end of June, up from 94 per cent in the June 2012 quarter, and beating the state-wide target of 80 per cent.

Eighty-four per cent of category three patients were treated within 30 minutes of arrival at the ED over the reporting period, up from 82 per cent in the previous quarter, and above the benchmark target of 75 per cent.

The service treated 70 per cent of semi-urgent category four patients within an hour of arrival at the ED, up from 64 per cent in the June 2012 quarter, and equal to the state average of 70 per cent.

For non-urgent category five patients, 92 per cent were treated within two hours of arrival at the ED, up from 84 per cent in the same period in 2012, and above the state average of 90 per cent.

Eighty-two per cent of non-admitted emergency department patients were discharged home within the benchmark four hours, an increase from the 79 per cent in the June 2012 quarter and above the state average of 78 per cent.

The service received 757 ambulance arrivals at the busy ED in the three months to the end of June, up from 681 during the previous three months.

The service completed the transfer of 94 per cent of patients who arrived at the hospital in an ambulance in the June quarter within the target of 40 minutes, better than the state-wide benchmark of 90 per cent.

CGHS chief executive Frank Evans said the data highlighted efforts by staff to improve services.

“We are very pleased with our results and the improvements achieved in a challenging financial environment,” he said.

“The health service is continuing to experience high activity and our performance has improved further in recent months.

“This is a result of ongoing efforts to streamline the journey for our patients in the emergency department and where desirable through to admission to hospital.”

Dr Evans said the service received a positive result in its first National Standards Quality and Safety Accreditation Survey.

“At the summation meeting we were informed that we had passed all 209 core standards,” he said.

“It is a very motivating for our doctors, nurses, allied health and ancillary staff to be able say that we have been independently audited and we can demonstrate that we are providing high quality and safe health services for our community.”