Omega tower to come down

The decommissioned Omega tower, the tallest structure in the Southern Hemisphere, is expected to be demolished.

The decommissioned Omega tower, the tallest structure in the Southern Hemisphere, is expected to be demolished.

THE decommissioned Omega tower navigation facility at Darriman will be dismantled, subject to heritage restrictions.

Gippsland MHR and Parliamentary Secretary for Defence Darren Chester said the tower Australia's tallest was now surplus to Defence requirements.

"I've been told that Defence is currently assessing the heritage value of the site and any demolition work will be subject to heritage restrictions," he said.

"Any demolition is not expected to happen before September, with the site to be fully disposed of in early 2015."

The 100 acre parcel of land, which had been commissioned to build the 432 metre (1417 foot) tower, will be made available for sale by the federal government.

The tower was one of a set of nine other navigation towers located around the world, including the United States, Trinidad, Argentina and Japan.

The Omega navigation system was shut down in 2000 and used as a transmitter for unidirectional communications to submarines until 2008.

Transmission equipment from the system is now on display at Port Albert's Maritime Museum.

The tower is the tallest structure in the Southern Hemisphere, attracting BASE jumpers.

A BASE jumper plunged to his death after jumping from the tower in January after his parachute failed to open.

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