Model UN meeting at Sale College

Sale College hosted a model UN caucus with Traralgon College, Yarram Secondary College and Kurnai College Morwell participating. Pictured are Sale College students Chad Giddings, Gemma Jerome and Claire Hallybone.
Sale College hosted a model UN caucus with Traralgon College, Yarram Secondary College and Kurnai College Morwell participating. Pictured are Sale College students Chad Giddings, Gemma Jerome and Claire Hallybone.

STUDENTS from across the region took part in a model United Nations caucus recently, with pupils from Sale College, Traralgon College, Yarram Secondary College and Kurnai College, Morwell, gaining insights into how issues are debated and resolved on an international scale.

The model UN , run by the United Nations Association of Australia Victoria Division, came to Sale as part of a touring roadshow, with Sale College chosen to host the event.

The program replicated the proceedings of the UN general assembly, with students divided into groups and given a country at random to represent, advancing that country's interests on a subject chosen for debate in a special assembly.

The subject for debate was climate change. With the UN comprising 193 member states, 21 countries were represented in the mock environment.

Sale College principal John Freyne said the program offered students an opportunity to engage in learning in an innovative and exciting way.

"The strength that I see in it [the program] is students from across schools learning from each other," he said.

"Skills in critical thinking and being able to think on your feet all come into effect."

Former Maffra resident Ian Howie, who worked for the real UN, acted as secretary general for the exercise.

Mr Howie, a UN staff member for more than 30 years, predicted China's rise as a global superpower would see it have even more say in world affairs.

"China is playing an increasingly important role in the UN , in part to fill the vacuum left as the current US administration withdraws to some extent from the key role they've historically played," he said.

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