Royal Commission fuel reduction advice 'ignored'

The Black Saturday Royal Commission found the Department of Environment needed to increase prescribed burning levels from 1.7 to five per cent of public land per annum in order to reduce fuel loads.
The Black Saturday Royal Commission found the Department of Environment needed to increase prescribed burning levels from 1.7 to five per cent of public land per annum in order to reduce fuel loads.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

A DECADE after the disastrous 2009 Black Saturday bushfires, monstrous bushfires heartbreakingly ravage the landscape once again, laying waste to lives and property.

Amidst the noise of hysterical lunatic left activists exploiting the bushfires to advance their green political agenda, we must never forget that the Royal Commission into Black Saturday found that the Department of Environment needed to increase prescribed burning levels from 1.7 to five per cent of public land per annum in order to reduce fuel loads and thus, bushfire risk.

Our radical left-wing premier, Daniel Andrews, abandoned any pretence of fulfilling this target soon after winning office in 2014.

Radical green ideologues like Andrews need to be held accountable for prioritising their political ideology above the safety of our families.

An alleged concern for biodiversity and the death of animals that might result from back-burning was used to justify ignoring the expert recommendations from the 2009 Royal Commission.

Now, more than one billion animals are estimated to have died as a result of these bushfires, which illustrates just how damaging and counter-productive green ideology is.

It is also clear that voting to change governments has only limited effect because of the bureaucracy being comprehensively controlled by the same lunatic left green ideologues who will always seek to undermine any attempt to move away from destructive green policies and seize upon any excuse to avoid the fuel reduction policies necessary to reduce bushfire risk.

That is why it is perhaps time for affected residents to consider their legal options to hold the government accountable for its negligence and-or breach of statutory duty.

A few billion-dollar payouts might be what it takes to force a rethink of the green policies ruining our state.

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