Letter to the editor | Politics can be a tough and rough game

Man writing on notebook with a pen and working on laptop computer on desk at home office, close up

Dean Culshaw, East Bairnsdale

THERE has been recent debate on these pages about the pros and cons of Darren Chester’s removal from the Cabinet and whether anyone should be blamed for that.
To know the answer of that we would need to ask the members of parliament, departmental staff, and the veterans constituency what they think.
Inevitably some will say he was a good minister, and some will say he wasn’t.
It is hard for us to know the truth if we are not in any of those groups.
People should just remember that it is possible to like the work Mr Chester does as a local member without always agreeing with the comments and decisions in Canberra that he makes
which are based on personalities or ideology.
Everyone can have their own opinion about that.
But politics can be a rough game and I doubt that Mr Chester can complain too much about being a victim of revenge, as Jenny Hammett of Traralgon claimed in her letter.
An article about the Victorian Nationals in The Australian on February 7, 2020, opened with this quote from Mr Chester:
“Politics is not a game where every child wins a prize and you all get the job you want.
“I’d just encourage my colleagues to focus on the people we’re elected to represent, and not argue among ourselves so much.”
Of course, this was said when Michael McCormack beat Barnaby Joyce and appointed
a Cabinet which did not contain any Barnaby supporters.
The shoe is in the other foot now.